Vocational Training & Development

New Directions recognizes the importance that employment and financial independence play in the transition to independence for young adults. We also believe that the sense of accomplishment that comes from successful work experiences enhances well-being. Through our Vocational skills program, our clients are offered unique opportunities to gain skills as well as to increase self-esteem and personal autonomy. These opportunities range from volunteer placements to employment in business throughout our local community.

 

Here at NDFYA we understand that your young adult often has many obstacles to tackle before being able to hold down a full-time job. Our goal is not to force any of our clients into a job, especially upon entering our program. Our clients are of all different ages, and some will often focus on education/internships initially so as to help build career experiences and personal development.

 

However, after educational goals are completed, we often encourage each of our clients to actively search for employment. Our Vocational Director Paula Breen and program “mentors” actively and strategically support each client, by helping them search for the appropriate “right job,” apply, and prepare for their interview and potential career training.

 

Not only is having a job a vital component for independence, but it is also extremely good for the mental health of all young adults. The esteem that comes to our students after becoming more self-sufficient is unparalleled. At the same time, we understand that many debilitating conditions can make a young adult temporarily incapable of working. During these periods of unemployment and or academic difficulties, many young adults sometimes lose their self-esteem.

 

As soon as clients enter our program we quickly address any underlying factors/conditions that may be affecting their functionality in society. The focus is also on the pursuit of academic and employment goals. We seek to eliminate the feeling that many young adults develop where they feel as if they are on the fringes of society not interacting with the world, and give them the tools and help needed to learn how to support themselves, and feel the shared emotions of their fellow coworkers on their daily routine.

 

This is one of the elements of “transitional living” that can make it very effective, we don’t only help treat the conditions of our clients in a clinical environment, we also strongly encourage clients to pursue academic goals and employment opportunities, clean their living environments, purchase their own groceries, be smart with their money, and form friendships with people that are also working on themselves.

 

Self-doubt and sometimes negative self image can hold some young adults back, but the great news is that with the help of our professional team at NDFYA, personal achievements are more than possible. When your young adult finally enters the world and becomes fully independent, the amazing feelings of esteem and contentedness from being fully self-sufficient will stay with your young adult for the rest of their lives.

 

Practicing these self-sufficient skills in a supportive environment allows our clients to get a taste of success, and being a part of a similar community.

 

We have helped countless young adults on their journey to independence achieve lasting employment and reach their academic goals, to view some of our success stories take a look at our student videos section. If you would like to learn more about how we can help your young adult please give us a call, the journey to independence for your young adult starts with the right environment and with trained professionals, don’t struggle on your own, we are just a call away.

 

To get started with helping your young adult transition to independence, please give us a call today. Also, take a look at our parent videos page so you can see how elated each parent is to have their newly independent young adult.

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