New Directions for Young Adults with Autism

roadmap to transitional living treatment
Dr. Drew Rubin

For most teens, becoming 18 years old is a life-marker that usually means so many things—opportunity, independence, and adventure. But if you are a young adult on the Autism spectrum, the age of 18 might not be much different from any of their other ages before.

Two new studies insist that we are reaching a precarious time with young adults on the spectrum coming of age, and not a lot of help for them. 

“Roughly 50,000 youth with autism will turn 18 years old this year,” said Dr. Paul T. Shattuck, an associate professor said on the website for the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute. Dr. Shattuck co-authored both studies, and insists, “So many of these young people have the potential to work and participate in their communities. Supporting this potential will benefit everyone – the person with autism, the family, employers and society.” 

But what can help these young adults discover their abilities in the workforce or community? Programs like New Directions For Young Adults is an excellent place to start.

We understand that things are different for your son or daughter with Autism. This is why we do not have one general program—we have two very specified ones, ready to help your child in exactly the right way. Our caring and knowledgeable staff will help guide them to learn new skills that encourage independent living. 

To speak with a professional and obtain more information regarding our program, call us toll free at (877) 763-5102.