How Pioneering Job Programs Could Lead to New Opportunities for Autistic Young Adults

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Dr. Drew Rubin

As teenagers transition from high school to college and/or jobs it is a time for excitement and anticipation.  But for young people on the Autism Spectrum it can be frightening and dreadful.

Nevertheless, these autistic kids are becoming adults, and in a world that doesn’t conform to their needs, society ought to recognize that this underserved group actually has unique talents that many companies need right now.  

New Directions has treatment programs that help young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder live normal and productive lives.  Call 877-763-5102 for additional information.

Young Adults With Autism Are Good Employees

Many young people with autism are quite smart; IQ is not a determining factor on the autism spectrum.  A high-functioning autistic person may not have the social skills that would be required for a sales job or customer service, but it is very likely that this person has a large capacity for detailed work like engineering or computer tasks. This is being recognized by many in the high-tech industry, which is leading to training and work programs for young people with ASD.

Wanting to make the transition into the workforce easier for autistic young adults on the, Gary Moore (whose 16 year old son is autistic) founded the nonPareil program in Plano, Texas. It’s a combination training program and software company for young adults on the autism spectrum. In a relatively short period of time, they have seen amazing outcomes with many of their students and employees, and are quickly becoming an example in providing practical, life-time solutions to adults with autism spectrum disorder.

Out of necessity come ideas.  Just like Moore, every parent desires the same future for each of their children as they transition into adulthood.  As more people assimilate autistic young adults into their companies and training programs, a powerful force of qualified workers will emerge to fill a need that is currently not met; high tech jobs are the Mecca for people with ASD.